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Affordable and Reliable Dial Up Internet service Provider -  Copper.net Specializes in Broad band internet, dial-up internet Services in the US and Canada. It is US based Company Offering services in reasonable prices, services start at $9.95 per month for unlimited dial-up internet access.

Copper.net  provides dsl service up to 125 X's faster with uninterrupted Connections , 5 Copper.net email accounts, 30 Hours of back up dial up service, Toll Free U.S. based support, 100% Customer Satisfaction to Areas Ranges From Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Wyoming, Georgia, Maryland, New Mexico, South Dakota  to Various Areas In United States.

Copper.net internet service includes Broadband Internet, Call Alert, Copper Archive, Dial Up Internet Service, Copper net DSL, E-mail, Hughes Net Satellite Internet, I Drive - Did you back it up?, Internet Phone Service, Web Hosting and Design For Satisfying All your Internet needs.

Copper.net  dial-up internet service Ranges From Unlimited connection For residential Usage  with Additional Features Like support v92 dialup modems and all their features. If you have call waiting and modem-on-hold software, you can stop missing calls while you're online. Offering standard Dial up connection with $9.95 per month and Premium Bundle plan with $14.95 per month. All services are backed by a 30 day money-back guarantee† and free technical support.

I have been in love with Copper.net, Copper.net Broadband Internet it is very trouble-free to use, Very Fast. Technical support is knowledgeable, well-mannered and long-suffering! One of the features that captivated me was excellent consumer ratings. I will recommend Copper.net to one and all I know For Affordable Dial Up modems and internet services. Thankfulness for providing this outstanding service at a sensible price.

Reliable Dial Up Internet Service Provider

Posted by dheepan dina 8 comments

Affordable and Reliable Dial Up Internet service Provider -  Copper.net Specializes in Broad band internet, dial-up internet Services in the US and Canada. It is US based Company Offering services in reasonable prices, services start at $9.95 per month for unlimited dial-up internet access.

Copper.net  provides dsl service up to 125 X's faster with uninterrupted Connections , 5 Copper.net email accounts, 30 Hours of back up dial up service, Toll Free U.S. based support, 100% Customer Satisfaction to Areas Ranges From Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Wyoming, Georgia, Maryland, New Mexico, South Dakota  to Various Areas In United States.

Copper.net internet service includes Broadband Internet, Call Alert, Copper Archive, Dial Up Internet Service, Copper net DSL, E-mail, Hughes Net Satellite Internet, I Drive - Did you back it up?, Internet Phone Service, Web Hosting and Design For Satisfying All your Internet needs.

Copper.net  dial-up internet service Ranges From Unlimited connection For residential Usage  with Additional Features Like support v92 dialup modems and all their features. If you have call waiting and modem-on-hold software, you can stop missing calls while you're online. Offering standard Dial up connection with $9.95 per month and Premium Bundle plan with $14.95 per month. All services are backed by a 30 day money-back guarantee† and free technical support.

I have been in love with Copper.net, Copper.net Broadband Internet it is very trouble-free to use, Very Fast. Technical support is knowledgeable, well-mannered and long-suffering! One of the features that captivated me was excellent consumer ratings. I will recommend Copper.net to one and all I know For Affordable Dial Up modems and internet services. Thankfulness for providing this outstanding service at a sensible price.

8 comments:

Microsoft has released the Windows 8.1 update for its flagship operating system.

Windows 8.1 screenshot
The update for Windows 8 restores some features to the operating system
The download seeks to address some of the criticisms levelled at the original version of Windows 8.
In particular, the update restores the start button and allows a computer to boot up with a traditional desktop interface.
The launch comes at a critical time for Microsoft as it seeks a new boss, with PC sales experiencing a long decline.
Windows 8 sought to bridge the gap between touchscreen devices, such as tablets and smartphones, and more traditional form laptops and desktop machines. As such it had an interface built of tiles that could be tapped or swiped to open applications.
However, many people found the tiled interface did not work well for some of the things they were used to doing with a computer.
The changes in 8.1 include:
  • start button - tapping once on this brings up the tiled interface and a long press opens up system controls
  • desktop mode - lets people avoid the tiled interface entirely
  • keyboard shortcuts - removes the need to toggle between different on-screen keyboards when typing numbers and letters
  • gesture control - some applications, such as those for cooking, can now be paged through without touching a screen
  • tile sizing - the blocks on the touchscreen interface can be in one of four sizes
  • web browsing - Windows 8 machines will now display separate web pages side by side
A host of other changes, including better support for multi-tasking and improved links to Microsoft's Xbox game console, are also in the update.
Shrinking sales
Microsoft SurfaceMicrosoft's touchscreen Surface tablet has not been a hit with consumers
Windows 8 was created to capitalise on the growing popularity of tablets and other portable gadgets. Microsoft needs to get people using its software on these machines because sales of desktop machines are in sharp decline.
Global shipments of PCs hit a five-year low in early October, according to figures from market research firm Gartner. Sales of PCs had now fallen for six quarters in a row, it added. The downward trend in sales statistics were confirmed by IDC, which added that the decline would probably continue into 2014.
The shrinking sales are important for Microsoft because traditionally the bulk of its revenue comes from people and companies buying laptops and desktops and office software to run on them.
It is not clear that Microsoft is adjusting to the changes in the types of gadgets that people use. In July, Microsoft wrote off $900m (£559m) following poor sales of its own-brand Surface touchscreen devices.
At the same time, Microsoft has undergone a major reorganisation and has bought phone maker Nokia. It is also launching a new version of its Xbox games console and has begun searching for a new chief executive.
Servers ready to dispense the update were turned on at 07:00 New York time (12:00 BST). The update is free to those already running Windows 8. Charges will apply if users upgrade to 8.1 from Windows 7. The update comes just over a year after the launch of Windows 8.

Windows 8.1 gets global released by yesterday October 17 2013

Posted by dheepan dina 13 comments

Microsoft has released the Windows 8.1 update for its flagship operating system.

Windows 8.1 screenshot
The update for Windows 8 restores some features to the operating system
The download seeks to address some of the criticisms levelled at the original version of Windows 8.
In particular, the update restores the start button and allows a computer to boot up with a traditional desktop interface.
The launch comes at a critical time for Microsoft as it seeks a new boss, with PC sales experiencing a long decline.
Windows 8 sought to bridge the gap between touchscreen devices, such as tablets and smartphones, and more traditional form laptops and desktop machines. As such it had an interface built of tiles that could be tapped or swiped to open applications.
However, many people found the tiled interface did not work well for some of the things they were used to doing with a computer.
The changes in 8.1 include:
  • start button - tapping once on this brings up the tiled interface and a long press opens up system controls
  • desktop mode - lets people avoid the tiled interface entirely
  • keyboard shortcuts - removes the need to toggle between different on-screen keyboards when typing numbers and letters
  • gesture control - some applications, such as those for cooking, can now be paged through without touching a screen
  • tile sizing - the blocks on the touchscreen interface can be in one of four sizes
  • web browsing - Windows 8 machines will now display separate web pages side by side
A host of other changes, including better support for multi-tasking and improved links to Microsoft's Xbox game console, are also in the update.
Shrinking sales
Microsoft SurfaceMicrosoft's touchscreen Surface tablet has not been a hit with consumers
Windows 8 was created to capitalise on the growing popularity of tablets and other portable gadgets. Microsoft needs to get people using its software on these machines because sales of desktop machines are in sharp decline.
Global shipments of PCs hit a five-year low in early October, according to figures from market research firm Gartner. Sales of PCs had now fallen for six quarters in a row, it added. The downward trend in sales statistics were confirmed by IDC, which added that the decline would probably continue into 2014.
The shrinking sales are important for Microsoft because traditionally the bulk of its revenue comes from people and companies buying laptops and desktops and office software to run on them.
It is not clear that Microsoft is adjusting to the changes in the types of gadgets that people use. In July, Microsoft wrote off $900m (£559m) following poor sales of its own-brand Surface touchscreen devices.
At the same time, Microsoft has undergone a major reorganisation and has bought phone maker Nokia. It is also launching a new version of its Xbox games console and has begun searching for a new chief executive.
Servers ready to dispense the update were turned on at 07:00 New York time (12:00 BST). The update is free to those already running Windows 8. Charges will apply if users upgrade to 8.1 from Windows 7. The update comes just over a year after the launch of Windows 8.

13 comments:

Sometimes your expectations can really cloud your view of reality.
According to a study from Consumer Intelligence Research Partners, 64 percent of all iPhone buyers in the last days of September chose the iPhone 5s. Only 27 percent went for the 5c, which many analysts (including myself) have said is too expensive to play the role of a "low-cost iPhone."
That has led CNBC, for one, to go with thehysterically false headline "Nobody seems to want Apple's iPhone 5c."
But the 5c is performing comparably with iPhones in its price bracket over the past two years. For the past few years, Apple has always had three iPhones in the market: a new, high-end product for $200 with contract, last year's model for $100, and then the two-year-old model for free.
In the quarter when the iPhone 5 came out, Strategy Analytics estimated that about 39 percent of iPhones sold were the 4s model, which held the same place in the market that the 5c does now. During the fourth quarter of 2011, the new iPhone was even more dominant: according to Consumer Intelligence Research Partners, 89 percent of buyers picked the iPhone 4s, and only 7 percent chose the iPhone 4.
So it's obvious that when a new iPhone comes out, most iPhone buyers want the fancy one. The iPhone is a luxury item, and $100 doesn't make enough of a difference to drive most people to the cheaper model. The 5c is priced just like previous models in this cycle were.
Later in the purchase cycle, more sales may shift to the 5c. A less-expensive, non-flagship product is for later adopters, not the day-one buyers. That's why analyst Ben Bajarin is saying "the time for the 5c is early to mid 2014."
Why the iPhone 5C?The iPhone 5c may have been a marketing experiment: can you juice up sales of, essentially, last year's iPhone by putting a colored back on it and giving it a new name? It looks like it's been moderately successful, just not disruptive.
Remember that the iPhone 5c is selling - it's just not selling as well as analysts hoped the mythical $300 iPhone would have. An estimate of 11.4 million iPhone 5c sales in a quarter is no mean feat, and according to analysts at Cannacord Genuity, this basically recycled phone is outselling Samsung's Galaxy S4 at AT&T and Sprint, a feat the older iPhone 5 couldn't accomplish over the previous few months. Apple probably couldn't have pulled that off without the new name and look.
There's also no proof so far that the mythically disruptive, low-cost iPhone would actually make money for Apple. Never confuse profit share with market share. Apple makes high-end, high-margin products. As long as it sells enough of them to achieve consumer critical mass - which it has done, consistently, since 2007 - that continues to be a very profitable business.
Apple can take some lumps for fooling itself to some extent here. According to the Wall Street Journal, Apple expected to sell more 5c phones and fewer 5s devices, and has thus had to tweak its order mix. Apple may have had more faith in the reality distortion field than was warranted. But once again, that doesn't make the 5c a failure. Not with 11 million sold.
The iPhone 5c is a tweak of Apple's strategy, not a complete re-envisioning. It's a test to see if more people will buy old wine when it's in a new bottle. It looks like that strategy's successful, just not as much as some people wanted it to be.
But please, let's not confuse "the iPhone 5c is selling as well as previous iPhones at its price point did" with "ZOMG THE 5c IS A FAILURE NOBODY IS BUYING THEM." Nobody is buying the Microsoft Surface. The 5c is a successful, midrange smartphone that could flourish as later adopters pick up iPhones early next year. It's not a disruptor, but given Apple's ongoing sales and profit success, it doesn't have to be.
For more, check out PCMag's reviews of the iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c.

The Apple iPhone 5c Is No Failure - Great feature, Good User friendly

Posted by dheepan dina 8 comments

Sometimes your expectations can really cloud your view of reality.
According to a study from Consumer Intelligence Research Partners, 64 percent of all iPhone buyers in the last days of September chose the iPhone 5s. Only 27 percent went for the 5c, which many analysts (including myself) have said is too expensive to play the role of a "low-cost iPhone."
That has led CNBC, for one, to go with thehysterically false headline "Nobody seems to want Apple's iPhone 5c."
But the 5c is performing comparably with iPhones in its price bracket over the past two years. For the past few years, Apple has always had three iPhones in the market: a new, high-end product for $200 with contract, last year's model for $100, and then the two-year-old model for free.
In the quarter when the iPhone 5 came out, Strategy Analytics estimated that about 39 percent of iPhones sold were the 4s model, which held the same place in the market that the 5c does now. During the fourth quarter of 2011, the new iPhone was even more dominant: according to Consumer Intelligence Research Partners, 89 percent of buyers picked the iPhone 4s, and only 7 percent chose the iPhone 4.
So it's obvious that when a new iPhone comes out, most iPhone buyers want the fancy one. The iPhone is a luxury item, and $100 doesn't make enough of a difference to drive most people to the cheaper model. The 5c is priced just like previous models in this cycle were.
Later in the purchase cycle, more sales may shift to the 5c. A less-expensive, non-flagship product is for later adopters, not the day-one buyers. That's why analyst Ben Bajarin is saying "the time for the 5c is early to mid 2014."
Why the iPhone 5C?The iPhone 5c may have been a marketing experiment: can you juice up sales of, essentially, last year's iPhone by putting a colored back on it and giving it a new name? It looks like it's been moderately successful, just not disruptive.
Remember that the iPhone 5c is selling - it's just not selling as well as analysts hoped the mythical $300 iPhone would have. An estimate of 11.4 million iPhone 5c sales in a quarter is no mean feat, and according to analysts at Cannacord Genuity, this basically recycled phone is outselling Samsung's Galaxy S4 at AT&T and Sprint, a feat the older iPhone 5 couldn't accomplish over the previous few months. Apple probably couldn't have pulled that off without the new name and look.
There's also no proof so far that the mythically disruptive, low-cost iPhone would actually make money for Apple. Never confuse profit share with market share. Apple makes high-end, high-margin products. As long as it sells enough of them to achieve consumer critical mass - which it has done, consistently, since 2007 - that continues to be a very profitable business.
Apple can take some lumps for fooling itself to some extent here. According to the Wall Street Journal, Apple expected to sell more 5c phones and fewer 5s devices, and has thus had to tweak its order mix. Apple may have had more faith in the reality distortion field than was warranted. But once again, that doesn't make the 5c a failure. Not with 11 million sold.
The iPhone 5c is a tweak of Apple's strategy, not a complete re-envisioning. It's a test to see if more people will buy old wine when it's in a new bottle. It looks like that strategy's successful, just not as much as some people wanted it to be.
But please, let's not confuse "the iPhone 5c is selling as well as previous iPhones at its price point did" with "ZOMG THE 5c IS A FAILURE NOBODY IS BUYING THEM." Nobody is buying the Microsoft Surface. The 5c is a successful, midrange smartphone that could flourish as later adopters pick up iPhones early next year. It's not a disruptor, but given Apple's ongoing sales and profit success, it doesn't have to be.
For more, check out PCMag's reviews of the iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c.

8 comments:

Google has announced a low-cost competitor to Apple TV - a "dongle" device called Chromecast.
The dongle is plugged into a television's HDMI port, and allows users to stream media from smartphones, tablets and computers.
Launching immediately in the US, the device will cost $35 (£23). There is as yet no word on international launches.

Google also announced an upgraded Nexus 7 tablet, the first to run the new version of the Android system.
Failed attempts
Chromecast is Google's latest attempt to gain ground in the television industry.
In 2012, Google faltered in its attempts to make a move into the living room, considered by many experts to be ripe ground for making large profits through advertising.
Google's partnership with Sony, with which it released a £200 set-top box, was poorly received.
That attempt followed an even earlier false start in 2010 when it launched Google TV, a service that was blocked by several TV networks, and suffered greatly from requiring consumers to buy expensive hardware.
More recently, the orb-shaped Nexus Q device, announced last year, fell flat almost immediately - Google pulled it from sale in response to "feedback".

Start Quote

I am not convinced that ordinary consumers will respond better to this tablet than the last one”
Jason JenkinsCNet
With Chromecast, Google is attempting to simplify its large-screen offering, focusing on streaming clips from services such as YouTube and Netflix via a far cheaper device.
The dongle plugs into a television's HDMI port, and uses wireless home internet to link to devices.
However, unlike other similar devices, such as Apple TV, the media is streamed from the cloud, rather than from the mobile device itself.
This, Google said, allowed for higher-quality streaming, and had less impact on battery life.
The search giant was especially keen to stress the dongle's ability to stream across multiple operating systems, be it Android or Apple's iOS.
This aspect in particular is central to Google's core strategy, said Gartner analyst Carolina Milanesi.
"It's a big departure from the Nexus Q," she told the BBC. "What it boils down to is a focus around YouTube - and getting people back into that ecosystem.
"If you look at the opportunities around advertising, they're getting eyeballs back to that."
New Nexus
Also shown off at the event was Google's updated Nexus 7 tablet, which will go on sale in the "coming weeks".
The tablet will be the first to run Android 4.3, the latest iteration of the Jelly Bean flavour of Google's mobile operating system.
Among the software's new features will be the ability to set restricted profiles, meaning parents can, for example, only give their child access to certain functions on a device.


The Asus-built device is slightly smaller, and 50g (1.8oz) lighter, than the original Nexus 7, which was launched last year.
The new device will have a screen resolution higher than any in its class, boasting 323 pixels per inch.
That is significantly higher than the iPad Mini's 163ppi and the 7in Kindle Fire HD's 216ppi.
But Jason Jenkins, from technology website Cnet, said it still had a lot of ground to make up with consumers.
"I am not convinced that ordinary consumers will respond better to this tablet than the last one," he said.
"Apple has established such momentum, Google's real challenge isn't just making a better tablet than Apple, it's persuading ordinary people to care that it makes one at all."
The new Nexus 7 will cost $30 more than it predecessor at $229 (£150), with other international prices yet to be announced.
The price point keeps it in line with Amazon's Kindle Fire, another key competitor - and considerably cheaper than Apple's iPad Mini, which retails starting at $329, or £269 in the UK.

Google launches Chromecast low-cost TV dongle

Posted by dheepan dina 10 comments

Google has announced a low-cost competitor to Apple TV - a "dongle" device called Chromecast.
The dongle is plugged into a television's HDMI port, and allows users to stream media from smartphones, tablets and computers.
Launching immediately in the US, the device will cost $35 (£23). There is as yet no word on international launches.

Google also announced an upgraded Nexus 7 tablet, the first to run the new version of the Android system.
Failed attempts
Chromecast is Google's latest attempt to gain ground in the television industry.
In 2012, Google faltered in its attempts to make a move into the living room, considered by many experts to be ripe ground for making large profits through advertising.
Google's partnership with Sony, with which it released a £200 set-top box, was poorly received.
That attempt followed an even earlier false start in 2010 when it launched Google TV, a service that was blocked by several TV networks, and suffered greatly from requiring consumers to buy expensive hardware.
More recently, the orb-shaped Nexus Q device, announced last year, fell flat almost immediately - Google pulled it from sale in response to "feedback".

Start Quote

I am not convinced that ordinary consumers will respond better to this tablet than the last one”
Jason JenkinsCNet
With Chromecast, Google is attempting to simplify its large-screen offering, focusing on streaming clips from services such as YouTube and Netflix via a far cheaper device.
The dongle plugs into a television's HDMI port, and uses wireless home internet to link to devices.
However, unlike other similar devices, such as Apple TV, the media is streamed from the cloud, rather than from the mobile device itself.
This, Google said, allowed for higher-quality streaming, and had less impact on battery life.
The search giant was especially keen to stress the dongle's ability to stream across multiple operating systems, be it Android or Apple's iOS.
This aspect in particular is central to Google's core strategy, said Gartner analyst Carolina Milanesi.
"It's a big departure from the Nexus Q," she told the BBC. "What it boils down to is a focus around YouTube - and getting people back into that ecosystem.
"If you look at the opportunities around advertising, they're getting eyeballs back to that."
New Nexus
Also shown off at the event was Google's updated Nexus 7 tablet, which will go on sale in the "coming weeks".
The tablet will be the first to run Android 4.3, the latest iteration of the Jelly Bean flavour of Google's mobile operating system.
Among the software's new features will be the ability to set restricted profiles, meaning parents can, for example, only give their child access to certain functions on a device.


The Asus-built device is slightly smaller, and 50g (1.8oz) lighter, than the original Nexus 7, which was launched last year.
The new device will have a screen resolution higher than any in its class, boasting 323 pixels per inch.
That is significantly higher than the iPad Mini's 163ppi and the 7in Kindle Fire HD's 216ppi.
But Jason Jenkins, from technology website Cnet, said it still had a lot of ground to make up with consumers.
"I am not convinced that ordinary consumers will respond better to this tablet than the last one," he said.
"Apple has established such momentum, Google's real challenge isn't just making a better tablet than Apple, it's persuading ordinary people to care that it makes one at all."
The new Nexus 7 will cost $30 more than it predecessor at $229 (£150), with other international prices yet to be announced.
The price point keeps it in line with Amazon's Kindle Fire, another key competitor - and considerably cheaper than Apple's iPad Mini, which retails starting at $329, or £269 in the UK.

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